Peru: life in the Andean lodge (part 8)

After you've been sick for a while, you get weak and shakey.  The first thing to do was to get my son to stand, then walk, then exit the hotel without falling down the stairs.  (no elevator) We made it to a local cafe, ate a little toast and drank some tea, then headed back to the hotel to get ready for the trip up the mountain.  You have to understand…

Peru comfort food: Chota style (part 7)

Within an hour of settling in the room, my son started throwing up violently, over and over all night.  Then the diarrhea started and there were times when both happened simultaneously.   Sometimes he wouldn't make it to the bathroom.  It's the kind of mess, that only a mother can clean.  We used every scrap of towel and every trash can available.…

Peru: At Least He Could Walk in to the Village Hospital (part 6)

Everything was dark except for one lighted sign in the rear of the hospital.  The word "Emergencia" glowed in the darkness. After the bus arrived in Chota, the rest of the group hopped into waiting 4-wheel drive vehicles for the kidney-crushing 12 Km ramble up the mountain to their lodge.   My son and I stayed in Chota with "the Professor" and our…

Peru: traveling where the paved road ends (part 5)

In spite of the fever, we decided to continue with our planned itinerary. We would take the local equivalent of a Greyhound bus and travel all day over a really big mountain pass to arrive in the middle of nowhere (I mean the town of Chota).  My son's fever was the same as the day before.  Maybe 102 or 103, F, (you folks who use Celcius will have to…

Off to Northern Peru (part 4)

Before leaving the hotel for the Cusco airport, Vidal told me privately that my son did not have altitude sickness.  Vidal was confident that my son had some kind of bug.  It was not the kind of quick, laid-out-on-your-bed kind of sickness.  It was a slow-brewing fever that caused a general sense of malaise.  As a gesture of his generosity, Vidal went…

"Nobody knew about our trips to Machu Picchu" by Vidal Jaquehua

It took me a while to write my story, but here we go. I been working in tourism for over 15 years as a licensed guide.  At the beginning for some compànies based here in Cusco, and then for some companies that are based in Lima.  I have personally guided over 5000 people to the sacred grounds of Machu Picchu. So with the time I did learn more and more…

Peru: Our Guide, Our Mother and Our Chicha Beer (part 3)

Vidal would be our guide, our mother and our angel, day and night, for the next week as we walked, drove and toured our way through Cusco, Sacsayhuaman (pronounced sexy woman, a pronunciation that did not go unnoticed by the males in my group) and Sacred Valley, on the way to Machu Picchu.  Vidal watched over us like Mother Teresa and when one student…

Just arrived in Cusco: who is this guy? (part 2)

The next morning, we filtered down to breakfast and boarded the van to return to the airport where we would fly to the city of Cusco at 11,000 feet above sea level.  Maneuvering a herd of teen-agers was wearing me down and after all, I am only human. "Teacher Jacquie, when is lunch?"  Teacher Jacquie, what time do we arrive?"  "Teacher Jacquie, where's…

An Authentic Latin Experience (part 1)

Twelve months later, 7 students, another teacher and I were slurping cocktails (not the kids, I promise) on the plane to Lima, Peru.  It took 10 months of preparations.  I met with parents, attorneys, (just kidding!) collected money, booked flights, copied documents, releases and medical reports and if phone calls and emails were tangible objects, I…

Hola! Hello!

It was an accident, unless you believe in fairies, fate or Pacha Mama.  How did an American soccer mom cross paths with an Incan guide in Peru?  And what's even more crazy, is how did we become friends and then business partners?  How did Adios Adventure Travel  get started? The "I" in this story, is me, the soccer mom.  I work in a small, private…